Training and Development

Whether you're new to ADR and want to find out more, or an experienced practitioner looking for career-enhancing training, CIArb has a course and qualification for you.

Why train with CIArb?

Our Pathways programme – ranging from Introductory Certificate, Advanced Certificate and Diploma will give you the specialist knowledge and skills you need to get ahead in ADR, whilst also qualifying you for membership of CIArb. 

Our training features include:

  • Worldwide reputation for excellence and service
  • Expert tutors who are leading practitioners and academics in the field of ADR
  • High quality training and workbooks designed by experts in the field
  • Courses that are suitable for all levels of experience
  • Fast-track courses for experienced professionals
  • Flexible and tailored training options with courses delivered worldwide
  • Tiered programme to support career progression
  • Rigorous teaching and assessment standards
Training and Development Blackboard
  • High quality training facilities
  • High level of candidate satisfaction through word of mouth recommendation
  • Experienced Education team to help with deciding which course is right for you

Arbitration

A row of books

Arbitration is a formal, private and binding process where disputes are resolved by a final award made by one or more independent arbitrators.

Find out more

Mediation

Mediation

Mediation is an informal, private and non-binding process where disputes are resolved by an independent and impartial mediator assisting parties to reach an agreement.

Find out more

 

Construction Adjudication

Construction Adjudication

Construction adjudication is a formal, private and binding process where construction related disputes are resolved by a decision made by an adjudicator.

Find out more

 

Training Pathways


What is arbitration?

Arbitration is a formal, private and binding process where disputes are resolved by a final award made by one or more independent arbitrators. The process of arbitration is a faster, simpler and less expensive alternative to litigation. The parties involved in a dispute must consent to arbitration and the arbitrator(s) to be used must be agreed by the parties or nominated by an independent body. 

Who can become an arbitrator?
Anyone can become an arbitrator. While many arbitrators are in the legal profession, many are not and come from various professional and technical backgrounds; arbitration is a secondary profession. The arbitrator has a judicial role in listening to the facts and evidence presented by the parties, applying the relevant law and issuing a final award. Parties will often seek someone who has the core skills required for an arbitrator and knows the area of business that the dispute has arisen in and therefore understand its complexities.

What is mediation?
Mediation is an informal, private and non-binding process where disputes are resolved by an independent and impartial mediator assisting parties to reach an agreement. The process of mediation is a faster, flexible and less expensive alternative to litigation. The parties involved in a dispute must consent to mediation and the mediator to be used must be agreed by the parties or nominated by an independent body.

Who can become an mediator?
Anyone can become a mediator. While many mediators are in the legal profession, many are not and come from various professional and technical backgrounds; mediation as a secondary profession. The mediator has a facilitator role to develop effective negotiations and communications between parties and work towards a resolution agreeable by both parties. Parties will often seek someone who has the core skills required for a mediator and knows the area of business that the dispute has arisen in and therefore understand its complexities.

What is construction adjudication?

Construction adjudication is a formal, private and binding process where construction related disputes are resolved by a decision made by an adjudicator. The process of adjudication is a faster, simpler and less expensive alternative to litigation. Construction adjudication in the UK is governed by statute and is available as a right where disputes arise on construction projects. The adjudicator to be used must be agreed by the parties or nominated by an independent body.

Who can become an construction adjudication?
Anyone can become a construction adjudicator. Adjudicators have a legal, architectural, engineering or surveying background. The adjudicator has a judicial role in listening to the facts and evidence presented by the parties, applying the relevant law and issuing a decision. Parties will often seek someone who has the core skills required for an adjudicator and the construction industry and therefore understand its complexities.

Continuing Professional Development Scheme

Continue your career development and become part of CIArb's CPD scheme.

If you are a member of a presidential panel you will be required to achieve 60 points over 3 years, at least 30 of which should be directly relevant to the area(s) in which you receive appointments and a minimum of 20 to be attained each year but otherwise may achieve the CPD requirements as you see fit.

All other CIArb members are encouraged to achieve 60 CPD points across three years with a minimum of 10 being attained each year.

Find out more